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2011, 8(1): 49-64. doi: 10.3934/mbe.2011.8.49

Joint quantification of transmission dynamics and diagnostic accuracy applied to influenza

1. 

PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012

Received  June 2010 Revised  September 2010 Published  January 2011

The influenza A (H1N1) pandemic 2009 posed an epidemiological challenge in ascertaining all cases. Although the counting of all influenza cases in real time is often not feasible, empirical observations always involve diagnostic test procedures. This offers an opportunity to jointly quantify transmission dynamics and diagnostic accuracy. We have developed a joint estimation procedure that exploits parsimonious models to describe the epidemic dynamics and that parameterizes the number of test positives and test negatives as a function of time. Our analyses of simulated data and data from the empirical observation of interpandemic influenza A (H1N1) from 2007-08 in Japan indicate that the proposed approach permits a more precise quantification of the transmission dynamics compared to methods that rely on test positive cases alone. The analysis of entry screening data for the H1N1 pandemic 2009 at Tokyo-Narita airport helped us quantify the very limited specificity of influenza-like illness in detecting actual influenza cases in the passengers. The joint quantification does not require us to condition diagnostic accuracy on any pre-defined study population. Our study suggests that by consistently reporting both test positive and test negative cases, the usefulness of extractable information from routine surveillance record of infectious diseases would be maximized.
Citation: Hiroshi Nishiura. Joint quantification of transmission dynamics and diagnostic accuracy applied to influenza. Mathematical Biosciences & Engineering, 2011, 8 (1) : 49-64. doi: 10.3934/mbe.2011.8.49
References:
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N. T. J. Bailey, "The Elements of Stochastic Processes with Applications to the Natural Sciences,", Wiley, (1964). Google Scholar

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H. M. Babcock, L. R. Merz, E. R. Dubberke and V. J. Fraser, Case-control study of clinical features of influenza in hospitalized patients,, Infect. Control. Hosp. Epidemiol., 29 (2008), 921. doi: 10.1086/590663. Google Scholar

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G. Chowell, M. A. Miller and C. Viboud, Seasonal influenza in the United States, France, and Australia: Transmission and prospects for control,, Epidemiol. Infect., 136 (2008), 852. doi: 10.1017/S0950268807009144. Google Scholar

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B. J. Cowling, L. L. Lau, P. Wu, H. W. Wong, V. J. Fang, S. Riley and H. Nishiura, Entry screening to delay local transmission of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1),, BMC Infect. Dis., 10 (2010). doi: 10.1186/1471-2334-10-82. Google Scholar

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C. Fraser, C. A. Donnelly, S. Cauchemez, W. P. Hanage, M. D. van Kerkhove, T. D. Hollingsworth, J. Griffin, R. F. Baggaley, H. E. Jenkins, E. J. Lyons, T. Jombart, W. R. Hinsley, N. C. Grassly, F. Balloux, A. C. Ghani, N.M. Ferguson, A. Rambaut, O.G. Pybu, Pandemic potential of a strain of influenza A (H1N1): Early findings,, Science, 324 (2009), 1557. doi: 10.1126/science.1176062. Google Scholar

show all references

References:
[1]

N. T. J. Bailey, "The Elements of Stochastic Processes with Applications to the Natural Sciences,", Wiley, (1964). Google Scholar

[2]

H. M. Babcock, L. R. Merz, E. R. Dubberke and V. J. Fraser, Case-control study of clinical features of influenza in hospitalized patients,, Infect. Control. Hosp. Epidemiol., 29 (2008), 921. doi: 10.1086/590663. Google Scholar

[3]

R. B. Banks, "Growth and Diffusion Phenomena: Mathematical Frameworks and Applications,", Springer, (1993). Google Scholar

[4]

S. A. Call, M. A. Vollenweider, C. A. Hornung, D. L. Simel and W. P. McKinney, Does this patient have influenza?, JAMA, 293 (2005), 987. Google Scholar

[5]

G. Chowell, M. A. Miller and C. Viboud, Seasonal influenza in the United States, France, and Australia: Transmission and prospects for control,, Epidemiol. Infect., 136 (2008), 852. doi: 10.1017/S0950268807009144. Google Scholar

[6]

B. J. Cowling, L. L. Lau, P. Wu, H. W. Wong, V. J. Fang, S. Riley and H. Nishiura, Entry screening to delay local transmission of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1),, BMC Infect. Dis., 10 (2010). doi: 10.1186/1471-2334-10-82. Google Scholar

[7]

C. Fraser, C. A. Donnelly, S. Cauchemez, W. P. Hanage, M. D. van Kerkhove, T. D. Hollingsworth, J. Griffin, R. F. Baggaley, H. E. Jenkins, E. J. Lyons, T. Jombart, W. R. Hinsley, N. C. Grassly, F. Balloux, A. C. Ghani, N.M. Ferguson, A. Rambaut, O.G. Pybu, Pandemic potential of a strain of influenza A (H1N1): Early findings,, Science, 324 (2009), 1557. doi: 10.1126/science.1176062. Google Scholar

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